Large Hopewell Burial Mound Discovered in Southern Indiana

Large Hopewell Burial Mound Discovered in Southern Indiana

 What may be one of the largest burial mounds in Indiana has been located near Paragon, Indiana, in Morgan County.  The burial mound was photographed on a recent trip to southwest Indiana.   A few dig marks were visible, but this mound has not been found nor desecrated by university archaeologists, yet.  From Strawtown to Mt. Vernon Indiana has been found artifacts that are closely related to the historic Oto Sioux.  Different tribes of the Dakota Sioux were in prehistoric times known as the Hopewell mound builders To see al of the Indian burial mounds in Indiana here

Ten Burial Mounds Described on Little Turkey Lake in Northeast Indiana

Ten Burial Mounds Described on Little Turkey Lake in Northeast Indiana



American Antiquarian, 1888
  In the extreme northeastern corner of Indiana, almost due north of the preceding, was another mound of this type. In the southwest corner of Steuben County, on the north shore of Little Turkey Lake, stood a group of 10 small mounds. One of the groups was examined and six strata of human remains were revealed, " distinctly separated by thin strata of earth; the skeletons lay on their backs, extended full length. Neither pottery nor implements occurred with the remains. (Levette, (l),p. 443.)

Ancient Burial Mound Photographed Near Cree Lake in Noble County, Indiana

Ancient Burial Mound Photographed Near Cree Lake in Noble County, Indiana

This burial mound is located to the east of the group of burial mounds described below on Cree Lake.


Indiana Geological Report, 1875
      Subsequently, Mr. G.C. Glatte, of Kendallville, took us eight miles north, to the farm of E. Shaddock, on the west side of Cree Lake, where a group of seven mounds is locatedon a tract of land of about twenty acres. The largest and central mound of the group is sixty feet in an east-west direction, and twenty-five feet north-south. Six others of smaller dimensions are located about the central mound, at unequal distances from it and each other, arranged without the least reference to any apparent plan or system.