Ancient Burial Mound Photographed Near Cree Lake in Noble County, Indiana

Ancient Burial Mound Photographed Near Cree Lake in Noble County, Indiana

This burial mound is located to the east of the group of burial mounds described below on Cree Lake.


Indiana Geological Report, 1875
      Subsequently, Mr. G.C. Glatte, of Kendallville, took us eight miles north, to the farm of E. Shaddock, on the west side of Cree Lake, where a group of seven mounds is locatedon a tract of land of about twenty acres. The largest and central mound of the group is sixty feet in an east-west direction, and twenty-five feet north-south. Six others of smaller dimensions are located about the central mound, at unequal distances from it and each other, arranged without the least reference to any apparent plan or system.

Archaeological Map of the Burial Mounds in Noble County, Indiana

Archaeological Map of the Burial Mounds in Noble County, Indiana


About  30 burial mound sites were physically investigated in Noble County, Indiana.  Many of these sites required 3 or 4 visits before getting access o the land.  A few burial mounds were photographed that had no historic provenance, but were shared with me because all I desired was to take a photo for posterity.  Many landowners shared that they had held information back about mound sites and skeletal remains being found from archaeologists because they knew that they could seize their land or destroy any mounds that were on their property. In the end, 8 mound sites were photographed and the directions provided in "The Nephilim Chronicles: A Travel Guide to the Ancient Ruins in the Ohio Valley."

Rare Photograph of the Ceremonial Cave Entrance at Mounds State Park

Rare Photograph of the Ceremonial Cave Entrance at Mounds State Park

Photograph of the cave entrance at the bottom of the bluff on the White River. Several historical accounts described the cave as possible extending to the earthwork complex above.

Map showing the entrance to the cave at the bottom of the bluff along with one of several of the natural springs.


History of Madison County, Indiana, 1880
        Above the spring represented in Plate E, and below the upper edge of the bluff, there are visible evidences of what appears to have been a subterranean passage communicating with the circular works A. It is said to have been, at one time, explored for a distance of sixty feet, where a round chamber, twelve feet in diameter, was reached. Beyond this the passage was closed, or nearly so, rendering a more extended exploration impracticable.

The spring that is situated at the cave entrance.  The high level of iron oxides has stained the stones a deep red color. Red ochre was symbolic of the menses and regenerating powers of Mother Earth.



Serpentine stone mound situated adjacent to the entrance to the cave entrance.  The serpent was the symbolic consort of the Earth Mother.