Nephilim Burial Mound is Staked With a Cross. Was This a Portal for Evil Spirits?

Nephilim Burial Mound is Staked With a Cross. Was This a Portal for Evil Spirits?


A single Adena burial mound is still visible in the late fall and winter months in Greene County, Indiana.  It has bee staked by a large cross. Was this a Nephilim burial that brought spirits or evil to the neighboring farms? 


Worthington Mound, Greene County, Indiana (Now Destroyed)
The mound was slightly elliptical, being three hundred and sixty feet wide from north to south and three hundred and sixty to three hundred and ninety feet long from east to west ; the extreme height of carried material at a point a little northeast of the center was nine feet six inches, sloping rapidly to the east, but with gradual incline south, north and west. The carried material was a fine loam or clayey earth brought from a neighboring marsh one-quarter to a half mile north, so that the distinction between the artificial mound and the natural surface of clear fluviatile sand was easily apparent. This material amounted to nearly four thousand cubic yards of earth—one thousand eight hundred wagonloads—and as these people had none of the tools of our time we may say one hundred and eight thousand basketfuls. Allowing that these workmen or builders would travel as far as an army under heavy marching orders, they would carry and deposit about one-half cubic yard per day to each man, or eight thousand days for one man. But considering that each man had to supply himself with food and that he joined in the dance and festivities common to barbarous people on ceremonial occasions, we may more safely estimate nine basketfuls, or nine cubic feet as a day's work; consequently it would require the labor of one man twelve thousand days or two hundred persons full sixty days.

The outlook due east was up a valley piercing the eastern bluff of White river, giving- the sleepless priest who guarded the ever burning fire upon his altar such opportunity of catching the first rays of sunrise as was necessary in calling his people by chant and drum to their morning devotion and worship of the sun—the fountain of life, light and comfort.