The Giant Adena Queen's Burial Mounds at Moundsville, West Virginia


The Giant Adena Queen's Burial Mounds at Moundsville, West Virginia


Early photo of the largest Adena Mound in the Ohio Valley that held the remains of their queen.

Charleston Daily Mail, October 22, 1922
“Skeletons in Mound”
"One of the most interesting of the five state parks is Mound Park, at Moundsville from which that city derived its name. Probably no other relic of pre-historic origin has attracted as wide study among archaeologists as the Grave Creeks mound which has given up skeletons of the ancients who constructed it. Aside from the mammoth tumulus, itself 69 feet high and 900 feet in circumference, there were originally no fewer than seven mounds situated in the broad plain at the point. None was nearly equal to the one now standing, and the locations of most of the smaller ones are now lost to all excepting a few. Archaeologists investigating the mound some years ago dug out a skeleton said to be that of a female because of the formation of the bones. The skeleton was seven feet four inches tall and the jawbone would easily fit over the face of a man weighing 160 pounds. Seventeen hundred ivory beads, 500 seashells of an involute species and five copper bracelets were found in the vault. The beads and shells were about the neck and breast of the skeleton while the bracelets were upon the arms. There was also taken from the mound the skeleton of a man eight feet tall. There were no ornaments beside it. These skeletons were sent to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington."