In Search of the Mount Shasta Stone Circle and Giants

In Search of the Mount Shasta Stone Circle and Giants


A series of  burial mounds surrounded by a stone curb are located  near Mount Shasta seen in the background.  The mounds are reminiscent of both the earliest mounds in North America at Watson BreakLouisianna, dating as early as 3000 B.C. and to Adena burial mounds in the Ohio Valley.
   Also, as in the Ohio Valley fairies have been described as residing in the area of the mountain.

Giants of the Mountain

   J.C. Brown who, in 1904, was employed with the Lord Cowdray Mining Company of London, England. He was hired to prospect for precious metals in this gold-bearing region, and while here, he ran onto a section of rock in the face of a cliff which didn't seem to match the surrounding formation. While examining the curious stone, he noticed it blocked the entrance to what appeared to be a cave. Brown, a geologist, thought the entire scene was unnatural and began to dig out the mouth of the cave, which was full of debris and vegetation. He began to see that it was not a small cave and after much digging found himself in a tunnel which curved downward into the mountain. Equipped with lanterns and miner's paraphernalia he set out to explore.

   "Three miles from the mouth of the tunnel I struck a cross-section containing gold-bearing ore and farther on, I struck another cross-section where an ancient race apparently had mined copper," he said later. He believed the other cross-sections outcropped on some other part of the mountain. The decline continued approximately 11 miles inside the mountain to where he found what he called "The Village Blets", where many rooms and chambers were found.

   The rooms were literally full of various plates, all inscribed neatly. The walls were lined with tempered copper and hung with shields and wall-pieces made of gold. Some of the golden plates he found were engraved with certain drawings and hieroglyphics. Rooms opened into other chambers, one of which appeared to have been a place of worship. In addition, there were 13 statues made of copper and gold and a large sun design from which protruded golden streamers. The way the objects were strewn about, he had the feeling the occupants of the underground village had left on the spur of the moment. And then he came upon a macabre scene - in one chamber he counted 27 skeletons, the smallest of which was 6'6" and the largest stretching out more than 10 feet. Two of the bodies were mummified, each clad in colorful, ornate robes. Brown spent many days exploring, studying the hieroglyphics, and indelibly imprinting them in his mind. He was excited about this great archaeological find and decided to leave the tunnel and its contents exactly as he had found them. He would return, he thought. But first, he cleverly concealed the entrance of the tunnel and marked on his map exactly were it was on the mountain.