Mohawk Indian Tradition of Welsh in Southern Indiana in 1150 A.D.

Mohawk Indian Tradition of Welsh in Southern Indiana in 1150 A.D.


   "The Mohawk Indians had a tradition among them, respecting the Welsh,Welsh, and of their having been cut off by the Indians at the falls of the Ohio. Col. Joseph Hamilton Daviess  mentions this fact and of the Welshmen's bones being found on Corn Island." "Some hunter, many years ago, informed me of a tombstone being found in the southern part of Indiana, with initials of a name, and 1186 engraved on it." — Hinde, 374. This tradition and tombstone he explains as follows : — "It is a fact that the Welsh under Owen  Zuinch, in the twelfth century, found their way to the Mississippi, and as far up the Ohio as the falls of that river at Louisville, where they were cut off by the Indians ; others ascended the Missouri, were either captured, or settled with and sunk into Indian habits. Proof; In 1799, six soldiers' skeletons were dug up near Jeffersonville ; each skeleton had a breast plate of brass, cast, with the Welsh coat of arms, the mermaid and harp, with a Latin inscrip tion, in substance, 'virtuous deeds meet their own reward.'" — Hinde, 373.