The Jacksontown Adena Burial Mound, Located Near Newark, Ohio

The Jacksontown Adena Burial Mound, Located Near Newark, Ohio

Recent photo of the Jacksontown Adena burial mound.  

Photo of the Jacksontown burial mound, located a few miles south of Newark prior to its excavation


     The earth mound on the plank road between Newark and Jacksontown, on the farm of Mr. Taylor, is one- of good size, and much interest attaches to it on account of the very careful and scientific examination given it, a few years ago, by Professor Marsh, of Yale college, and who gave it a very extensive notoriety through "Silliman's Journal," as well as in a carefully prepared pamphlet publication. He found in it ashes, charcoal, flint, a broken pipe made of soft limestone, pieces of a tube of the same material, a string of over one hundred native copper beads, strung on a twisted cord of coarse vegetable fibre ; also shell beads, human skeletons, decayed layers of reddish brown powder, layers of burned clay, white chaff, implements of various kinds, lance and arrow heads, six hand axes made of hematite and green stone, a hatchet, a flint chisel, a flint scraper, many bone implements, five needles or bodkins from three to six inches in length, made of the bones of the deer, an implement for moulding pottery, numerous peculiar implements made from the antlers of the deer and elk, a whistle made from the tooth of a young black bear, spoons made of shells, a vessel of coarse pottery, frag ments of a vase, various animal bones, such as the elk, deer, rabbit, wolf, woodchuck and river mussel, and various other things, including seven teen human skeletons, in whole or in part. No bones of domestic animals were found. The exploration of the mound was more perfect and thorough than that of any other within the limits of the county, and its yield of archaeological treasure was generous. Mr. G. P. Russell, of Harvard college, with a number of gentlemen of Newark, assisted in this examination, and retained possession of some of those valuable mound deposits. This is but a single instance of the richness of this county, archaeologically considered, and shows what treasures are yet in reach of those who would give these mounds a thorough examination.