Kramer Iroquois Indian Earthen Fortification in Allen County, Indiana Near Fort Wayne

Kramer Iroquois Indian Earthen Fortification in Allen County, Indiana Near Fort Wayne
Lost Indiana history

     Ancient Allen County?  Indiana Indians have left the richest prehistoric remains in Northeast Indiana  in Allen County near the city of Fort Wayne. Two earthworks and three burial mounds can still be found in the county, but nothing is recognized as an historic site.  Archaeologists at IPFW have published their report on the Kramer Iroquois earthen fortification, but redacted everything from the report that would indicate the location of the earthwork.  Yet, stated the need for the earthwork to be preserved. Keeping in mind that when an archaeologists say "preserved" it means preserved for more digs and inevitable destruction. Why this is not part of Fort Wayne's tourism is a complete mystery.
     The only way this ancient Iroquois earthwork will be preserved is if people become aware of it and its location.

A series of horseshoe shaped earthworks were constructed by the early Iroquois tribe as early as 500 A.D. along the Maumee River near Toldeo.  Identical forts were also constructed on the St. Joe River, near Ft. Wayne and at the headwaters of the Eel River in Whitley County, Indiana.


Two parallel earthworks can be found at the river"s edge and traced a distance in the woods.  The end or enclosed area was partially destroyed by farming.  A slight moat or ditch is still visible on the outside of the earthen wall that once held a wooden stockade.


Only a small section of the end of the Kramer Iroquois earthwork is still visible.  Its height is much larger than the two parallel walls the extend from the river.  



A local artist from Ft. Wayne, Indiana drew this recreation of the Kramer Iroquois earthwork. The houses are Adena and not correct. The earthwork likely contained a Long House within its walls.
The Native Americans depicted should have looked more "Iroquois," and less like the artist that drew it.





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This is the location of the Iroquois Earthwork that the archaeologists call the "Kramer Earthwork"  But,
DO NOT TRY TO ACCESS THIS SITE.  THE OWNERS HAVE SHERIFFS PATROL THE AREA VIGILANTLY AND YOU WILL GET ARRESTED FOR TRESPASSING.

Over 85 Prehistoric Earthworks in Indiana and 222 Total in Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky and Michigan