Ancient Indian Works Near Sheboygan Wisconsin

Ancient Indian Works Near Sheboygan Wisconsin




shows the general character of a very interesting group at the country residence of Dr. J. F. Seely, on a prominent point of land on the north side of the river, three miles above its mouth. They are in the northeast quarter of section twenty-eight, in township fifteen, and range twenty-two. The mounds are mostly of the kind called “lizards,” though presenting some remarkable variations from the usual type of the species, as a naturalist would say. In one the tail is crooked, with a double curve of serpentine form; in another it makes a considerable angle with the body; and a third has the front leg or projection extended forward. Two of the mounds are apparently of the same general character, except that they have two gradually tapering extensions or tails, projecting in opposite directions, as will be seen by reference to the plate. At the Doctor’s house is a work consisting of three nearly parallel ridges, united at the southern extremity, not far from the edge of the steep hill on which the preceding works are situated. They are about two hundred feet in length, but have only a slight breadth and elevation.
This promontory resembles in its general form the fortified hills so often found in Northern Ohio and in New York; but, after a careful search, no trace could be found of a wall extending across from one hill to the other. The occupants probably relied for defence upon the natural security of the position, as in numerous other instances in Wisconsin.
Other works are known to exist towards the head of this fine stream.
With the exception of a few small mounds near the village of Manitowoc, we have now described all the ancient works in the vicinity of the “Great Lake.” The last named are situated on the northeast quarter of township nineteen, half a mile northwest of the village. One of them was penetrated to some depth below the original surface, but not the least trace of any deposit could be detected. Pits had been dug in several other mounds, and, so far as we could learn, uniformly with the same negative results. The soil here is sandy, and the materials of the mounds consist of sand, with spots of darker color or mould, as if portions of the surface soil were mixed with the sand. There are eight mounds, situated on a level plain elevated about sixty feet above the river, to which there is a very steep descent. They are not exactly round, but of an oval form: the longest diameter lying in a north and south direction, or at right angles with the steep bank.